Improve your house. Preserve your home.

The architectural story starts in the Dutch town Honselersdijk. More specifically in the street Stompersdijk: the home where Dennis grew up, and his parents before him. A house that provided three generations a warm home.

If we revisit Dennis’s house nowadays, we would consider it to be a clearly outdated post-war dwelling. it lacks space, comfort and consumes around 175 euro of energy each month. Shouldn’t we just demolish this house?

Prêt-à-Loger believes we should not, as despite its faults, this home contains valuable memories which should be preserved. We believe that in the end it is all about finding a balance between what should ben improved and what should be preserved: improving your house, preserving your home. Improving the climate and spatial performance of the house, while preserving the properties that make these houses into homes.

Our solution: The Skin – an extra layer put over the house, which improves both the spatial and the climate performance of the existing house, without touching the quality of a home. The Skin was inspired by the food greenhouses, typical of the area.

However this is not just about one specific house: in the Netherlands roughly 1.4 million dwellings are this post-war row house typology (SenterNovem,2007b). Not to mention many more in the UK and Germany. Dwellings that share the same outdated climate and spatial conditions as Dennis’s home. It is in this existing building stock that lies the biggest sustainability challenge for Holland.

Therefore this is not just our story, but possible your story as well.
Find out more about the project here.



“My grand parents started living in Honselersdijk: it was newly built. They were very happy that they could live in one of the houses, because in that time there really was a lack of living space. It was a nice house in that time, perfectly suitable for a young family to start their live. When my grandparents moved in my father was one year old.”
 

 

 
“One unique characteristic of the neighborhood were the greenhouses. Typical of the Westland. They were there already in the time that my father was a small boy. On the one picture he is rowing the boat next to the greenhouses. Many years later, there is me in the same place. You can see how the greenhouses developed over the years, almost doubled in size!”

Improve your house. Preserve your home.

The architectural story starts in the Dutch town Honselersdijk. More specifically in the street Stompersdijk: the home where Dennis grew up, and his parents before him. A house that provided three generations a warm home.


“My grand parents started living in Honselersdijk: it was newly built. They were very happy that they could live in one of the houses, because in that time there really was a lack of living space. It was a nice house in that time, perfectly suitable for a young family to start their live. When my grandparents moved in my father was one year old.”
 

If we revisit Dennis’s house nowadays, we would consider it to be a clearly outdated post-war dwelling. it lacks space, comfort and consumes around 175 euro of energy each month. Shouldn’t we just demolish this house?

Prêt-à-Loger believes we should not, as despite its faults, this home contains valuable memories which should be preserved. We believe that in the end it is all about finding a balance between what should ben improved and what should be preserved: improving your house, preserving your home. Improving the climate and spatial performance of the house, while preserving the properties that make these houses into homes.

Our solution: The Skin – an extra layer put over the house, which improves both the spatial and the climate performance of the existing house, without touching the quality of a home. The Skin was inspired by the food greenhouses, typical of the area.
 

 
“One unique characteristic of the neighborhood were the greenhouses. Typical of the Westland. They were there already in the time that my father was a small boy. On the one picture he is rowing the boat next to the greenhouses. Many years later, there is me in the same place. You can see how the greenhouses developed over the years, almost doubled in size!”

However this is not just about one specific house: in the Netherlands roughly 1.4 million dwellings are this post-war row house typology (SenterNovem,2007b). Not to mention many more in the UK and Germany. Dwellings that share the same outdated climate and spatial conditions as Dennis’s home. It is in this existing building stock that lies the biggest sustainability challenge for Holland.

Therefore this is not just our story, but possible your story as well.
Find out more about the project here.